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Changes Coming to Nutrition Labels

food labelThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed two new rules that will result in changes to the Nutrition Facts label on food packages. These two rules (0910-AF22 and 0910-AF23,) require updating the nutrition information and changing the format and appearance of the label to help consumers make healthy dietary choices. The FDA suggests that new Food Science evidence discovered in the last 18 years should be used to alter the content and appearance of the Nutrition Facts label, allowing consumers to use the information more effectively to keep healthy diets.

Changes on the label are expected to include:

  • Serving sizes that are meant to be consumed in one sitting to make the calorie and other nutrient information more clear. FDA may also adjust recommended serving sizes for some foods.
  • Package-front labeling changes so that certain nutrients are more visible to the consumer.
  • Adding the percentage of whole wheat to the label to avoid mislabeling a product as “whole wheat” when in reality there is only a small percentage of it in the food.
  • Clearer measurements, for example, using teaspoons instead of grams on the label.
  • Adding a line for sugars and syrups that are not naturally occurring in foods and drinks and are added when they are processed or prepared.

The FDA has sent guidelines for the new labels to the White House, but there is no timeline as to when they might be released. So it is unclear exactly what the label will look like but the food industry, nutritionists, and health advocates will all have their say. When finalized, this rule will affect most foods that are currently required to have nutrition labeling.

How will this impact you, especially the cost to your labeling? You can talk to us to help you decide on cost-effect labeling. Call us at (603) 598-1553.

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